Friday 56 – House of Salt and Sorrows

house of salt and sorrowsThe Friday 56 is hosted by Freda’s Voice. The rules are simple – turn to page 56 in your current read (or 56% in your e-reader) and post a few non-spoilery sentences.

This week’s quote is from the brand new House of Salt and Sorrows by Erin A. Craig. It’s based off the fairytale of the dancing princesses – where the girls mysteriously wear out their shoes every night and their family doesn’t know why. It’s a lovely gothic novel and my full review will be up tomorrow!

This quote is a bit of dialogue between two sisters; one around young adult age, the main character and the one whose viewpoint the book is told from, and one much younger. They are discussing two of their older, tragically dead, sisters.

I squeezed her shoulders. “We haven’t forgotten her. We need to move on, but that doesn’t mean they don’t miss and love her.”

“She doesn’t think so.”

I frowned. “What do you mean?”

“She thinks everyone is too busy with their lives to remember her.” She glanced back out into the hall as if worried our conversation was being overheard. “Elizabeth says so too. She says we all look different now. But she doesn’t.”

“You mean when you remember her?”

She shook her head. “When I see her.”

Friday 56 – Small Town Hearts

small town heartsThe Friday 56 is hosted by Freda’s Voice. The rules are simple – turn to page 56 in your current read (or 56% in your e-reader) and post a few non-spoilery sentences.

This week’s quote is from Small Town Hearts by Lillie Vale, recommended to me by Rachel Strolle on Twitter. It’s an adorable YA book about a summer tourist town on the coast of Maine.

Days passed, Thursday morning sneaking up on me in the blink of an eye. It was the summer of everything and nothing. Sleepy starts and sleepy ends.

No one was in a hurry to do anything because we all knew these were the last few days of summer when the town belonged to us, the people who had been here all along.

But soon, the mornings began with the peppering of hammer falls all over the town as local businesses started getting ready for the tourists. HELP WANTED signs went up, gift shop windows filled with new displays, and flowers bloomed in the streets.

Even Busy’s did our part with newly painted trims and soaped and shined windows overlooking boxes of geraniums and lavender. A faint smell of paint lingered, so we’d put on our fans on to clear the air.

Friday 56 – Wicked Fox

wicked foxThe Friday 56 is hosted by Freda’s Voice. The rules are simple – turn to page 56 in your current read (or 56% in your e-reader) and post a few non-spoilery sentences.

This week’s quote is from Wicked Fox by Kat Cho, a modern fairy-tale-like book about a fox-girl and the boy who loves her.

Parts of conversations drifted over. She heard the words violent and freak. This was not a good start to a new school. And she was good at gauging that. She’d been in a dozen schools, and each had proven to be the same. Kids, no matter where they lived, just wanted to fit in. And that meant ridiculing anything and anyone that didn’t. Fitting in was practically against Miyoung’s genetic makeup. No matter how much she’d tried to match a mold, she always popped back out. A fox peg trying to fit into a human-shaped hole.

Friday 56 – Unmentionable

UnmentionableThe Friday 56 is hosted by Freda’s Voice. The rules are simple – turn to page 56 in your current read (or 56% in your e-reader) and post a few non-spoilery sentences.

This week’s quote is from Unmentionable: The Victorian Lady’s Guide to Sex, Marriage, and Manners, by Therese O’Neill. It’s a tongue-in-cheek book written for the 21st century woman who has time-traveled to Victorian times. It’s a riot.

Page 56 starts with a quote from George Napheys, the author of The Physical Life of Woman: Advice to the Maiden, Wife, and Mother, published in 1888.

“Whatever stimulates the emotions leads to an unnaturally early sexual life. Late hours, children’s parties, sensational novels, ‘flashy’ papers, love stories, the drama, the ball-room, talk of beaux, love, and marriage, – that atmosphere of riper years which is so often and so injudiciously thrown around childhood, – all hasten the event which transforms the girl into the woman. A particular emphasis has been laid by some physicians on the power of music to awaken the dormant susceptibilities to passion, and on this account its too general or earnest cultivation by children has been objected to.”

Absolutely. Top hits of 1888 included such lascivious titles as John Philip Sousa’s “Semper Fidelis” march and the painfully overt “Where Did You Get That Hat?” Where, indeed. From the devil’s quivering loins, most likely.

Friday 56 – Internment

internmentThe Friday 56 is hosted by Freda’s Voice. The rules are simple – turn to page 56 in your current read (or 56% in your e-reader) and post a few non-spoilery sentences.

This week’s quote is from Internment, a gut-punch of a read by Samira Ahmed, on the very timely topic of rounding up people of certain ethnicities and putting them in concentration camps. It is Young Adult fiction, but only just.

I feel like this quote needs a content warning, but I don’t know what to label it with besides EXTREMELY anxiety-inducing.

I inch back farther, closer to the door at the other end of the vestibule, which will take me to my car, where I’ll be safe. Safe? I catch myself. Because there is no safe for me. Suddenly I’m acutely aware of how small this space is and how loud the train wheels sound against the tracks, and I wonder if people will hear me if I scream.

The door behind the guard slides open again. A tall, broad-shouldered Exclusion Guard steps into the vestibule. God, now there are two of them and I have literally nowhere to run. My hands shake. I can’t call for any help because the people who are enforcing the law on this train are the ones I’m afraid of. Every fiber in my body wants to scream and cry, and I want to pound my fists into the metal walls.

Friday 56 – The Candle and The Flame

the candle and the flameThe Friday 56 is hosted by Freda’s Voice. The rules are simple – turn to page 56 in your current read (or 56% in your e-reader) and post a few non-spoilery sentences.

This week’s quote is from The Candle and The Flame, a young adult fantasy by Nafiza Azad.

Fatima makes up her mind to leave, when suddenly something moves in the darkness. She smells something foul, something wrong, senses it stir in the shadows just beyond the puddle of light in which Sunaina and her friends stand.

A growl, low and guttural, comes from the darkness and even those unaware of the malice freeze. Fear blooms fully on the faces of the people, including Sunaina and her friends, closest to the shadows.