Friday 56 – Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore

risingThe Friday 56 is hosted by Freda’s Voice. The rules are simple – turn to page 56 in your current read (or 56% in your e-reader) and post a few non-spoilery sentences.

This week’s quote is from Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore by Elizabeth Rush. I have an interesting dual review planned for this one, once I finish it. I read most of another climate change book (I stopped reading for reasons I will explain in the review) and I’ll be comparing the two.

All along the Eastern Seaboard, workers took shovels to swampy land, hoping to drain the sections prone to retaining water.

The Civilian Conservation Corps didn’t care that ditching would transform the hydrology of the entire ecosystem. The standing water in which mosquito larvae hatched was greatly reduced – and with it went hundreds of other species. Dragonflies and water beetles. Mummichogs and silversides. The seaside sparrow. The great egrets and white ibis. So, over a decade ago, the US Fish and Wildlife Service started plugging the ditches. They thought intervening in an already altered hydrological system might be able to return the marsh to a state of equilibrium. They thought they might be able to bring back the water beetles and wading birds. But, it turned out, layering one kind of human intervention on top of another only dragged the Sprague further from its starting point.

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Friday 56 – Poltergeist

poltergeistThe Friday 56 is hosted by Freda’s Voice. The rules are simple – turn to page 56 in your current read (or 56% in your e-reader) and post a few non-spoilery sentences.

This week’s quote is from Poltergeist, book 2 of Kat Richardson’s Greywalker series.

That was the crux of our problem: Will wanted a stable, honest relationship and the best I could offer was a catch-as-catch-can string of interrupted dates, creepy clients, and mysterious disappearances – which had almost brought our romance to an end on the first date. I wasn’t very good at separating my work from my life – especially since the Grey and its denizens didn’t respect office hours – and that was something I doubted I could break Will to, even if I’d wanted to.

Friday 56 – Pride

prideThe Friday 56 is hosted by Freda’s Voice. The rules are simple – turn to page 56 in your current read (or 56% in your e-reader) and post a few non-spoilery sentences.

This week’s quote is from Pride by Ibi Zoboi, a young adult Pride & Prejudice retelling.

“I saw you!” Madrina sings as she sits on her leather armchair and wipes down her unlit seven-day candles with a Florida-water-dampened white cloth. The whole basement smells like that sweet cologne. If the roof of my building is where Janae and I steal quiet moments, then the basement is where I dive deep into my own thoughts and dreams with Madrina and her claims of comunicando con los antepasados. To Madrina, and all her clients, the basement is home to Ochún, the orisha of love and all things beautiful. For them, this is a place of magic, love, and miracles.

These spirits and unseen things, as Madrina calls them, don’t make sense to me. Of course they don’t. I can’t see them. But it’s Madrina’s wisdom that unties the tight knots of my life, so I play along with what she does for a living and try to believe in these spirits.

Friday 56 – All Out

all outThe Friday 56 is hosted by Freda’s Voice. The rules are simple – turn to page 56 in your current read (or 56% in your e-reader) and post a few non-spoilery sentences.

This week’s quote is from All Out – The No-Longer-Secret Stories of Queer Teens Throughout the Ages. It is an anthology of short stories, and page 56 lands in the story And They Don’t Kiss At The End by Nilah Magruder.

She liked that there was no kissing.

She had never seen the appeal of kissing, not after Mary-Ann had kissed her first boyfriend at the end of sixth grade and told half the block about it, not when Dee had had her first kiss freshman year, at one of Nadia Boone’s weekend basement parties full of beer and disco.

That had been a whole year before Vince moved to town. Kevin Campbell was sweet, but the kiss had been messy and wet and Dee had been very miserably aware of every second of it. It had gone on forever, and not in a good way.

Friday 56 – Once & Future

once and futureThe Friday 56 is hosted by Freda’s Voice. The rules are simple – turn to page 56 in your current read (or 56% in your e-reader) and post a few non-spoilery sentences.

Today’s quote is from Once & Future, a queer retelling of the King Arthur story in space by two non-binary authors. It’s fantastic. I got my copy through Illumicrate, so it’s a different color cover with gorgeous sprayed edges; it’s green, where the official cover is pink. I’ll have a picture on my review. (I actually think I like the pink better, but I do love me some sprayed edges!)

They wove around women who sold things to the incoming crowds. Corsets pushed their bosoms halfway to their chins, roses and daggers tucked into significant cleavage. “Nice robes,” one said in a husky tone, and Merlin perked with delight. “You order those special?”

“They were made by the enchanted spiders of the Near Woods,” Merlin said.

“Good for you,” the woman said, tossing him a free map and a package of nuts. Merlin didn’t recognize the half-moon shape, but they were browned and buttery. He ate them in handfuls as they reached a market lines with open-faced shops. The wind whipped from a new direction, bringing the tantalizing aromas of roasting meat, tangy mead, and spiced stews.

Friday 56 – Endless Water, Starless Sky

endless water starless sky

The Friday 56 is hosted by Freda’s Voice. The rules are simple – turn to page 56 in your current read (or 56% in your e-reader) and post a few non-spoilery sentences.

Today’s quote is from Endless Water, Starless Sky, the sequel to Bright Smoke, Cold Fire, a Romeo and Juliet retelling by one of my favorite masters of the trope, Rosamund Hodge!

He knelt down again beside her. His people were not like hers; they did not believe that elaborate ceremonies and spells could guarantee them a happy afterlife. They did not believe that anything awaited them after death at all. This girl, whose dead, blank eyes still stared at him, was already less than dust.

But the Mahyanai did honor their dead: all night, before the bodies were burned, they sat vigil.

He couldn’t honor this girl like a Catresou should, but he could do this much for her, anyway.

So Romeo knelt beside the dead girl and waited.